Ancient Ice

We had been driving for hours at a snail’s pace. The roads were like skating rinks, and angled. It was a heavy winter for Icelandic standards. Still, our adventure van from Kefcar car rentals ambled along.

We finally pulled into Jokulsarlon– a glacial lagoon with enormous icebergs that float around in a seemingly orchestrated dance before being sent out into ocean, to break-apart and melt.

There’s a black sand beach neardby where you can find the remnants of these massive icebergs littered like forgotten jewels.

This is one of them.

Newfoundland Camping

Newfoundland

National Geographic rates Newfoundland as a must-visit location! Stunning coastline, fabulous plateaus, and moose! Moose everywhere! Most people visit during the summertime–but The Expeditioners opted to go on the cusp of winter, at the end of November, beginning of December. Suffice to say that we had Gros Morne National Park all to ourselves.

Bella had sprained her ankle rock-climbing, but still opted to come-along on the adventure–part of which consisted trekking up Gros Morne. This photo was taken just after setting up our tent to a full moon.

Back-Country BC

Back-Country BC

I’ve been skiing since I was 5 years old. Every weekend, my parents would drop me off with the YMCA ski school which would take us to a different mountain for the day. The surrounding area of Montreal has the highest concentration of ski hills in the world. Mont Saint Sauveur, Owl’s Head, Orford, Tremblant, Mont Blanc, Sutton, Jay Peak, Bromont, Chanteclair and many more. While these hills are nowhere near the majesty of Canada’s West Coast Mountains, they sufficed for my adolescent and teenage years.

About 6 years ago, I went to ski Whistler and Blackcomb in Canada’s West– and learned what a true ski mountain consists of. Extremely long runs, inspiring views, and powder… lots of powder! Yet this was not to be the final step in the evolution of my skiing, for indeed it was only a few years ago that Bella and I got into the world of back-country skiing and touring.

Exponentially harder, back-country skiing consists of heading into remote regions with a special ski binding that allows your heel to lift. By donning ‘skins’ (fuzzy mohair strips that attach with glue to the bottom of your skis) you are able to literally ski uphill. You begin below the tree line and wind your way through pine trees, across avalanche chutes, and up into the alpine.

It can take hours to reach your destination– always heading higher and higher. The exertion is exhausting, as you carry your gear/food/water in backpack. But it is well worth it. For once you reach the top, you get to lay fresh tracks in knee deep powder, with not a soul in sight except for your ski partner. It’s liberating and extremely rewarding.

In this photo you see Bella after an awesome descent in British Columbia’s Marriot Basin.

Where to stay while you ski: Canada’s back-country has a network of huts up in the mountains, so that you can leave all your camping gear in the hut while you run epic powdery run after epic run.

It took us 5- hours to reach the Wendy Thompson Hut in Marriot Basin which is owned and operated by the Alpine Club of Canada. We did it in a snowstorm and late in the day and without knowing the route. You can easily shave off a couple of hours if you know the way.

Required Equipment:
1. Back-Country Skis, or Snowboard
2. Avalanche Transceivers
3. Shovel
4. Backpack
5. Skins
6. Ski Poles
7. Gloves/ Tuque/ Wool Socks
8. Shell Jacket
9. Down Jacket
10. GPS (not necessary, but good to have in the back-country)

The World Of Trak Kayaking

Sea- Kayaking allows one to explore otherwise inaccessible places. From remote lakes to rugged and stunning coastlines– a kayak is the perfect medium to go camping. You can fill it with your equipment and head off to discover the world!

It was when we began exploring third world countries that we began to understand the importance of having our own sea kayaks. We wanted to explore lakes and oceans with the kayaks available in places like Belize and Mexico, but quickly discovered that the boats were barely sea-worthy and even less so for the type of multi-day expeditions that we so thoroughly enjoy.

Enter the TRAK KAYAK. A folding kayak that fits into a golf bag, has a hydraulic system to stretch the frame, and can carry a superb payload! We have taken ours to Iceland, Mexico, Australia and all over Canada!

Learn more about them at www.rethinkkayak.com

Manicouagan

 

Expedition Whitsunday

RGG_5272

test

 

Expedition Africa

I’ve been to over 30 countries in my 30 years of life, but never have I been to the African continent. That’s about to change in a couple of weeks.

We’ll be exploring South Africa, Senegal, and Mozambique on this trip of a lifetime– so follow along for our social media blitz! We’ll be photographing Great Whites with SharkLady Adventures, going on safari with Outlook Safaris in Kruger National Park, and lodging with Villas do Vilanculos.

We’ll also be testing scuba gear from Aeris, wetsuits from Lavacore, and backpack from Lowepro and a polarised filter from Kenko!

Explore Africa