Tested Gear Guide: Julbo Wave

Reviewer :The Expeditioners Roberto
Gear: Julbo Wave Sunglasses

It’s not often that a pair of shades lasts more than 3 months with us. And it’s not because we’re careless. It’s because sunglasses are one of those items that you can practically use every single day (depending on where you live.) But this frequent use, like anything else, is what usually causes there to be a high probability that you will lose them, scratch them, or break them.

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If you’re an outdoor adventurer, then that probability is even higher. Which is why Bella and I literally go through about 7 lost/broken/sunken pairs of sunnies per year. In the past year, we drove over a pair that had fallen in the snow, lost 4 to kiteboarding, one got scratched so badly that their un-usable (while crawling through a section of caves 1km into the earth that were 3 feet tall and 70 feet long,) and another also got bent out of whack somehow.

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So it’s with great surprise that I still have my Julbo Wave sunglasses after 5 months. And there’s a key factor why… they float.

When we’re kiting, the crashes can be pretty superb– and for a few moments you don’t know what is up, left or right. Most sunglasses don’t float– so if they came off your face, then Poseidon’s got a new look. Thanks to me, he has a new collection now.

With the Wave shades– they float perfectly. My solution to keep them from ripping off my face (when possible) was to put one of those touristy floaty bands. Both for keeping them on my face and for greater visibility after a crash. And trust me– these Julbos are so comfortable that you don’t want to lose them!

With many of the glasses I lost, the band just ripped off the end of the arms. In the case of Julbo’s Waves, I can tie the band to the arm tips, which kept it from tearing off like the others. The strap they supply is great for kayaking and calmer water sports, but tended to snap off with my kiting wipe-outs. Luckily, the wave’s arms have holes through which you can tie the strap nice and tight.

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Even if your strap does come off, with the Waves, after the confusion of a crash settles, you can easily spot them floating. Now it isn’t just the floating factor that made these one of my faves, it’s the incredible polarized lenses coupled with fantastic full eye-protection. When you do lots of water and snow sports, the sun is reflecting on the water or snow from beneath you- usually squeezing under your glasses and hurting your eyes. But with these, they cup your eyes just perfectly– so that no sun squeezes through, and so that I don’t get water into my eyes that’s kicking up from my board.

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Another neat factor I like is the drainage/venting holes, so that when you do take a dunking and come out–the water just drains out nicely. They give great air circulation while still protecting you. Must have been a water athlete that designed these! Here’s a few pics of mine in use!

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But what if you’re biking or doing a sport where you have way too much humidity and you nee extreme air circulation? Then you just snap off a section and suddenly they’ve got all the ventilation you could ask for. Transformer cool.

If you want to get yourself a pair, you can input ‘The Expeditioners’ as a promo code and get 10% off ANY Julbo shades!
Link to purchase: www.julbo-canada.ca

Website: www.julbo-canada.ca
Test Locations: Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico | Yellowstone National Park, USA | Whistler, B.C. Canada
Price: $130
Available in 5 color combos.

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THE EXPEDITIONERS MAGAZINE LAUNCHES

The most frequent question that we receive from fans is: How do you do it? How do you make this lifestyle possible? How can you afford to travel so much? Can anyone do it?

The succinct answer to those queries is: By being super creative and flexible. By breaking norms, asking for things, and inspiring others. It’s not as expensive as you imagine and yes, anyone can do it–even you.

Why don’t I write here the full answers? How we began? How we approach sponsors? How we pay for daily life? And the stories of making it happen? Because one of the ways in which we’re working to continue making this concept possible is by keeping the answers to things as such in our magazine: The Expeditioners Magazine.

We’ve also kept the best of personal stories of adventure, gear reviews, destination guides and much more off of our blog and social media. But you can find it all in the coolest adventure magazine you’ve ever read– and at the same time, keep the content flowing!

We sell one issue for $7.99 and the subscription for 5 issues for $29.99.

You have various options for getting it:

1. Download “The Expeditioners Magazine” from the itunes app store. Then go to your newsstand and click on the magazine and choose to download one issue or the subscription.

Link on Itunes App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/the-expeditioners-magazine/id749088955?ls=1&mt=8&fb_source=message

2. If you have a Kindle device, you can go to the Amazon App store and download The Expeditioners Magazine App :
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HNX1UMY

3. If you have a desktop computer, you can pay through PAYPAL and then receive a code to access and read The Expeditioners Magazine on our website. Link here: http://theexpeditioners.com/store/subscribe-to-the-expeditioners-magazine/

To all those who have already purchased our magazine–thank you for your amazing support–it means a lot to us! over 1000 The Expeditioners Magazine App downloads on itunes already! Thank you also to all those who contributed on our amazing fundraising campaign–you are amazing!

Below is the video from our fundraising campaign! THANK YOU! We did it!

The Expeditioners Magazine Issue 1

Whistler, British Columbia, CANADA | THE EXPEDITIONERS | DESTINATIONS | Travel Guide to the World

Whistler, British Columbia, CANADA | THE EXPEDITIONERS | DESTINATIONS | Travel Guide to the World
By. The Expeditioners Roberto
Photos and videos by Roberto & Bella
WHERE: Whistler, British-Columbia, Canada

WHEN WE WENT: #ExpeditionCanada took us zig-zagging over 16500km—from East to West. After four months of exploring the country, we got into Whistler the second week of November and stayed for almost two weeks.

WHAT WE DID: Whistler is renowned for its skiing and snowboarding. Whistler/Blackcomb is by far the best ski resort that we have ever explored. With big powder dumps and vast terrain—it’s a downhiller’s paradise. Luckily for us, the resort came on board and sponsored us 4 days of skiing and boarding. Official opening date was November 28th—but the season’s snow started well enough that people were on the hills two weeks in advance already..including us. We went for short hikes—visited around town, and reminisced about all the crazy adventures we had on previous trips to the region: back-country skiing, heli-skiing, and snowshoeing!

WHERE WE STAYED: Our lodging was amazing in one of our favourite resort towns in the world: It began with the Hilton Resort & Spa, then Legends at the foot of Creekside, onto the Crystal Lodge in the heart of the village, and ended with the luxurious Chateau Fairmont Whistler.
Other Sponsors: Whistler Tourism | InReach Canada | Mountain Hardwear | HGregoire | AutoTrim Estrie | Whistler- Blackcomb

OTHER THINGS TO DO:
1. Snowmobiling Adventure
2. Go Zip-Lining from Tree Canopy to Canopy
3. Take the Peak to Peak Gondola
4. In summer time get an adrenaline rush with some downhill mountain biking
5. Mountain Biking what some call the best trails in the world.
6. Bungee Jumping
7. Explore Lost Lake
8. Whistler Sliding Center
9. Go Heli-Skiing. There’s nothing like it!
10. Cross-Country Ski the Black Tusk Trail
11. Go Back-Country skiing to Marriot Basin or Cerise Creek

HOW TO GET HERE:
A. Fly to Vancouver and then drive or take the shuttle to Whistler (only 1.5hours)

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Yellowknife, NWT, CANADA | THE EXPEDITIONERS | DESTINATIONS | Travel Guide to the World

Yellowknife, Alberta, CANADA | THE EXPEDITIONERS | Destinations | Travel Guide to the World
By. The Expeditioners Roberto
Photos and time-laspe by Roberto & Bella

WHERE: Yellowknife (and surrounding area), Northwest Territories, Canada

WHEN WE WENT: It was this past end of August, and we stayed in the area for almost 3 weeks. The end of August is a particularly nice time to go because you are able to see the Northern Lights dance across the sky on every evening that there are no clouds. We captured nightly time-lapse after time-lapse, and can difinitively say that these were the best lights we have ever seen! Secondly, for the outdoorsman, most of the bugs are gone. This is a fantastic thing for canoeists, hikers, boaters, kayakers or cottage goers.

WHAT WE DID: We explored Yellowknofe Old town, getting Bella a pair of handmade Mukluks. We spent a week at the Willow Ridge Retreat on the outskirts of YK, photographing the Northern Lights, Mountain Biking, and took out the canoe on Prelude lake for some mind-boggling sunsets. We also headed out on a spectacular 10 day expedition on Great Slave Lake–exploring nameless islands, feeling the expanse of this enormous body of water, and capturing skies like we have never seen before

WHERE WE STAYED: The Willow Ridge Retreat is the perfect place to stay if you are looking for the Northern Lights. Being about 25km from town, there is no light pollution here, and you can sit on their idyllic viewing deck all night watching the starry skies be painted in swirls of green, white and purple. We camped in Prelude Lake Territorial Park as well.
Learn More about the Willow Ridge at www.willowridgeretreat.ca

HISTORY: Yellowknife’s name originates from a Chipewyan tribe who used weapons and tools made of copper that appeared yellow in colour. This tribe battled the Dogrib of the area for many years but the Dogrib Dene re-claimed the area in the 1820s. The Yellowknives Dene of today are the descendents of the Chipewyan tribe. In 1825 Chief Akaitcho became a peacemaker when, at Mesa Lake, he participated in a famous peace treaty with Dogrib Chief Edzo, ending the long period of hostility and warfare between the Chipewyan and Dogrib. The city is also known as Sombe K’e, which means “place of money” in the Tlicho language.In the 1930s gold was found on the shores of Yellowknife Bay. It changed Yellowknife forever. By 1936 it was a boomtown to which southerners, often plagued financially by the Great Depression, flocked for work and adventure.

OTHER THINGS TO DO:
1. Visit Old Town
2. Stay at the Aurora Village
3. Stay in a B&B Boat House
4. Canoe the Tibbit Lake Circuit
5. Mountain Bike on the Tundra
6. Explore the Gallery of the Midnight Sun & Weaver- & Devore for arts crafts and all your camping needs.
7. Cameron Fals Hiking Trail

HOW TO GET HERE:
A. Jets connect Edmonton and Calgary to Yellowknife 6 times per day. Fly with Air Canada, Canadian North, First Air and WestJet

Three highways link the North to Yukon, British Columbia and Alberta. Drive up the Alaska Highway through Yukon to link to the NWT’s Dempster Highway. Follow Alberta Highway 35 north to connect to NWT Highway 1, the Mackenzie Highway. British Columbia Highway 77 connects to NWT Highway 7, the Liard Highway.

There’s scheduled bus service on the Mackenzie Highway, and seasonal bus service on the Dempster Highway. Vehicle and RV rentals are available for the Mackenzie Highway from Edmonton, Alberta, and for the Dempster Highway from Whitehorse, Yukon.

Road Distances: From Yellowknife to:
Miles KM
Vancouver, BC 1613 2595
Edmonton, AB 937 1508
Calgary, AB 1110 1789
Winnipeg, MB 1773 2853
Toronto, ON 2824 4544
Whitehorse, YT 1180 1900
Chicago, IL 3078 4953
Dallas, TX 3150 5069
Salt Lake City, UT 2036 3278
Denver, CO 2391 3848

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More on the ‘Eagle Cam’

We have all imagined or dreamed of what it would be like to fly like and eagle, and recently, thanks to an eagle cam–we saw what it would feel like. But little was known on the details of the flying eagle’s tour of Chamonix– except that the video received more than 6 million views in a very short period of time.

It turns out that the video was made by Jacques Olivier Travers, who operates a raptor center in Haute-Savoie, France. He rescues injured birds and teaches them how to fly again. Travers is a certified falconer and happens to be the youngest person in France that is actually allowed to keep raptors in captivity.

His technique for teaching the birds how to fly again is by paragliding alongside them in the air, something that he has found to be far more effective than the traditional technique of reintroduction.

By showing the raptor cam videos, Travers is enlightening the public on the plight of these injured raptors while also making us dream of flight.

Below you can check out his latest video which he filmed on France’s TF1 network.

The white-tailed eagle’s name is Victor.

What Fits Into a Kayak

The Expeditioners Magazine Gear Guide: What fits into a Kayak?

The Expeditioners concept has been long in forming. It started with my adventures camping Quebec’s wilderness regions, and exploring the most remote places I could find. This video was filmed several years ago–when I was just getting into sea-kayaking. Somehow the videos got a ton of views– but I’ll be the first to admit that they’re somewhat long-winded, and that indeed, my list of necessities has changed some. Like bringing Wellington’s instead of Mountaineer Boots.. but hey, you learn:

Imagine–before coming up with The Expeditioners name, I was considering “Desert Penguin” and “My Wild” !!

PART ONE:

PART TWO:

PART THREE:

Bear Bang Gear Review: Tru Flare

The Expeditioners Video Gear Review: Tru Flare

Being out in the wild requires you be conscience of the wildlife. For us Canadians that enjoy wilderness travel, there will always be Black Bears and Grizzly Bears to deal with exploring the wild!

You can startle them quite easily if you’re coming up a trail and they didn’t hear you. And your defence against these hairy canines (when you don’t have a rifle) are more intended to deter, than to stop. Enter the Tru Flare, a pen sized device that launches blanks into the air with a loud bang in the hopes of scaring them away. Be reminded that there is no guarantee that a.the bear will get scared from the noise or b. that you’ll actually have time to launch one before being charged.

This one that I demonstrate using is an aar-jarring shotgun-style bird banger that shoots 125 ft away from you. Noise level: 115 dB.

You can also use the pen-launcher for Emergency Flares. Check-out our demonstration of the Bear Bang in Willmore Wilderness, Alberta, Canada (Aka. Bear Region!)

Rock Out in the Wild

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Do you listen to tunes when you’re camping or doing adventure sports in the wild? Or do you prefer nature’s sounds throughout your entire camping experience?

On our travels (and in conversations) I’ve found that there are two camps on this debate– those that love it, and those that scoff at listening to music in the bush. Personally, we love it. At the right time. Paddling across a pristine lake at night with the stars sparkling above and a little Enya or Sigur Ros on the earphones truly transports you. Trekking 15km of portages in a day can be awesome with the right tunes on–but without, it can be just grueling. The crackling campfire is wonderful– but add a little Jack Johnson to it and it is sublime.

Granted, there are times when the sounds of the loon are all we need. Like dawn.

So, it’s natural that we’ve gone through all sorts of earphones and speakers on our adventures– destroying many along the way. But through trial and error we eventually found the perfect little sound system for the bush. Enter Goal Zero Canada’s “Rock-Out” Speaker. The magic in this little fella’s great acoustics lie in the fact that the speaker is in a wood box inside of it’s casing–creating rich and great sound. What about batteries? No problem, plug the speaker into your solar panel and charge it up! Or you can simply charge it via USB. Still, neither of these things is what impresses me the most.

What has never ceased to amaze us is how indestructible the Rock-Out is. We’ve filled them with sand on the beach, got them wet kayaking, covered them with snow while winter camping, and dropped them an innumerable amount of times. They really have gone through The Expeditioners test…and somehow…they still manage to rock on.

Funk Factor: Purported to run up to 20 hours on a 2 hour charge–we’ve reached 15 hours!

Learn more about them at www.goalzero.ca

Photo by The Expeditioners Magazine Roberto
In photo you have the Goal Zero Nomad 13.5 charging my ipod mini and the “Rock-Out” Speaker on the left.

The Rock-Out Speaker