Tested Gear Guide: Julbo Wave

Reviewer :The Expeditioners Roberto
Gear: Julbo Wave Sunglasses

It’s not often that a pair of shades lasts more than 3 months with us. And it’s not because we’re careless. It’s because sunglasses are one of those items that you can practically use every single day (depending on where you live.) But this frequent use, like anything else, is what usually causes there to be a high probability that you will lose them, scratch them, or break them.

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If you’re an outdoor adventurer, then that probability is even higher. Which is why Bella and I literally go through about 7 lost/broken/sunken pairs of sunnies per year. In the past year, we drove over a pair that had fallen in the snow, lost 4 to kiteboarding, one got scratched so badly that their un-usable (while crawling through a section of caves 1km into the earth that were 3 feet tall and 70 feet long,) and another also got bent out of whack somehow.

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So it’s with great surprise that I still have my Julbo Wave sunglasses after 5 months. And there’s a key factor why… they float.

When we’re kiting, the crashes can be pretty superb– and for a few moments you don’t know what is up, left or right. Most sunglasses don’t float– so if they came off your face, then Poseidon’s got a new look. Thanks to me, he has a new collection now.

With the Wave shades– they float perfectly. My solution to keep them from ripping off my face (when possible) was to put one of those touristy floaty bands. Both for keeping them on my face and for greater visibility after a crash. And trust me– these Julbos are so comfortable that you don’t want to lose them!

With many of the glasses I lost, the band just ripped off the end of the arms. In the case of Julbo’s Waves, I can tie the band to the arm tips, which kept it from tearing off like the others. The strap they supply is great for kayaking and calmer water sports, but tended to snap off with my kiting wipe-outs. Luckily, the wave’s arms have holes through which you can tie the strap nice and tight.

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Even if your strap does come off, with the Waves, after the confusion of a crash settles, you can easily spot them floating. Now it isn’t just the floating factor that made these one of my faves, it’s the incredible polarized lenses coupled with fantastic full eye-protection. When you do lots of water and snow sports, the sun is reflecting on the water or snow from beneath you- usually squeezing under your glasses and hurting your eyes. But with these, they cup your eyes just perfectly– so that no sun squeezes through, and so that I don’t get water into my eyes that’s kicking up from my board.

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Another neat factor I like is the drainage/venting holes, so that when you do take a dunking and come out–the water just drains out nicely. They give great air circulation while still protecting you. Must have been a water athlete that designed these! Here’s a few pics of mine in use!

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But what if you’re biking or doing a sport where you have way too much humidity and you nee extreme air circulation? Then you just snap off a section and suddenly they’ve got all the ventilation you could ask for. Transformer cool.

If you want to get yourself a pair, you can input ‘The Expeditioners’ as a promo code and get 10% off ANY Julbo shades!
Link to purchase: www.julbo-canada.ca

Website: www.julbo-canada.ca
Test Locations: Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico | Yellowstone National Park, USA | Whistler, B.C. Canada
Price: $130
Available in 5 color combos.

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What Fits Into a Kayak

The Expeditioners Magazine Gear Guide: What fits into a Kayak?

The Expeditioners concept has been long in forming. It started with my adventures camping Quebec’s wilderness regions, and exploring the most remote places I could find. This video was filmed several years ago–when I was just getting into sea-kayaking. Somehow the videos got a ton of views– but I’ll be the first to admit that they’re somewhat long-winded, and that indeed, my list of necessities has changed some. Like bringing Wellington’s instead of Mountaineer Boots.. but hey, you learn:

Imagine–before coming up with The Expeditioners name, I was considering “Desert Penguin” and “My Wild” !!

PART ONE:

PART TWO:

PART THREE:

Bear Bang Gear Review: Tru Flare

The Expeditioners Video Gear Review: Tru Flare

Being out in the wild requires you be conscience of the wildlife. For us Canadians that enjoy wilderness travel, there will always be Black Bears and Grizzly Bears to deal with exploring the wild!

You can startle them quite easily if you’re coming up a trail and they didn’t hear you. And your defence against these hairy canines (when you don’t have a rifle) are more intended to deter, than to stop. Enter the Tru Flare, a pen sized device that launches blanks into the air with a loud bang in the hopes of scaring them away. Be reminded that there is no guarantee that a.the bear will get scared from the noise or b. that you’ll actually have time to launch one before being charged.

This one that I demonstrate using is an aar-jarring shotgun-style bird banger that shoots 125 ft away from you. Noise level: 115 dB.

You can also use the pen-launcher for Emergency Flares. Check-out our demonstration of the Bear Bang in Willmore Wilderness, Alberta, Canada (Aka. Bear Region!)

Rock Out in the Wild

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Do you listen to tunes when you’re camping or doing adventure sports in the wild? Or do you prefer nature’s sounds throughout your entire camping experience?

On our travels (and in conversations) I’ve found that there are two camps on this debate– those that love it, and those that scoff at listening to music in the bush. Personally, we love it. At the right time. Paddling across a pristine lake at night with the stars sparkling above and a little Enya or Sigur Ros on the earphones truly transports you. Trekking 15km of portages in a day can be awesome with the right tunes on–but without, it can be just grueling. The crackling campfire is wonderful– but add a little Jack Johnson to it and it is sublime.

Granted, there are times when the sounds of the loon are all we need. Like dawn.

So, it’s natural that we’ve gone through all sorts of earphones and speakers on our adventures– destroying many along the way. But through trial and error we eventually found the perfect little sound system for the bush. Enter Goal Zero Canada’s “Rock-Out” Speaker. The magic in this little fella’s great acoustics lie in the fact that the speaker is in a wood box inside of it’s casing–creating rich and great sound. What about batteries? No problem, plug the speaker into your solar panel and charge it up! Or you can simply charge it via USB. Still, neither of these things is what impresses me the most.

What has never ceased to amaze us is how indestructible the Rock-Out is. We’ve filled them with sand on the beach, got them wet kayaking, covered them with snow while winter camping, and dropped them an innumerable amount of times. They really have gone through The Expeditioners test…and somehow…they still manage to rock on.

Funk Factor: Purported to run up to 20 hours on a 2 hour charge–we’ve reached 15 hours!

Learn more about them at www.goalzero.ca

Photo by The Expeditioners Magazine Roberto
In photo you have the Goal Zero Nomad 13.5 charging my ipod mini and the “Rock-Out” Speaker on the left.

The Rock-Out Speaker

Diving Africa Part 3/10

DIVING AFRICA
Post 3/10

The streets of Dakar, Senegal were hustling and bustling when we arrived. Vendors hawked their wares. Cars honked without purpose, and people filled every empty space. Not exactly the backdrop I imagined for scuba-diving, but hey..you never know.

The dive shop–named Oceanium was easy enough to find, and was located around an open bar/cafe area, overlooking the Atlantic. We got introduced to our dive-master Mamadou- a tall fellow with a ready smile- who marveled at the quantity of gear that we pulled out of our Jetpacks.

Conversation flowed and we got to spend some time explaining our kit to him and sipped some coffee that would wake-up a 12 year old dead horse. The vibe was like that of most dive-shops, relaxed–but ebbing with an excitement… an excitement to dive.

We detached our bags from the BC’s and prepped-our kit for what was to be our first dive in Africa.

Gear Guide: AERIS Jetpack BC is adjustable to all sizes. From the back, to the shoulder straps to the waist strap–it all adjusts. I’m 6’1 and Bella is 5’4. And the Jetpack fits us both. It was nice not to have to rummage through my checked-luggage for dive gear. Everything was snug in my Jetpack bag section…even my Accel fins!

Find part 1 and 2 at www.theexpeditioners.com

Sponsored by Aeris, Oceanic Worldwide, Lavacore Int’l, Ikelite Underwater Systems

Attaching Jetpack

The Engines

Dive day

Diving Africa Part 2/10

The Expeditioners
DIVING AFRICA
Post 2/10

By visiting different countries (Senegal, Mozambique, South Africa) on Expedition Africa–we really got to tell the difference between cultures. Each country was so clearly distinct from the other– which was fascinating! Likewise, our diving experiences were extremely different in each country. But that’s to be expected from destinations so far apart from each other.

From Dakar, Senegal to Gansbaai, South Africa it is about 6800kms– and from Gansbaai to Vilanculos about 2000kms as the crow flies. We were hoping to get the Sardine Run as well, but alas, it just wouldn’t fit into our scheduling.

Senegal was out first testing ground for our new gear. We were happy that we didn’t have to fidget with the equipment, as dive was challenging to say the least.

When we decided to go to Africa, we knew that a trip to the continent wouldn’t be complete without diving with great white sharks– and so we booked with Sharklady Adventures. Little did we know how up close and personal we would get to be with them!

Our principle reason for choosing Mozambique as a dive destination was in the hopes of seeing Whale Sharks, as Tofo and Vilankulo are known for their sightings. But nature beats her own drum, and from what I understand, those sightings of the gentle giant have become more and more rare. Still, we got to spend some quality time with a giant grouper!

Dive Gear Tip: Taking your AERIS Jetpack as your carry-on is a fantastic solution for flying with your dive kit. But what happens when your plane is a little itsy-bitsy plane who’s overhead compartments are half the size of regular planes? Simple, once you are on the plane and stowing your bag un-clip your BC from the bag section of the Jetpack (making it half the size,) and stow the two sections separately in the overhead, OR put one section in the overhead and the other under the seat in front of you.

Diving Africa Part 1/10

The Expeditioners
DIVING AFRICA
Post 1/10

Africa. My 7th continent. It was going to be a big trip. Criss-crossing the continent, exploring, photographing, scuba diving. A big trip with a lot of flights.

We would first visit Bella’s family in Senegal (two flights,) then fly through Mali and onto Ethiopia where we would catch a night’s sleep.. before catching another flight to Johannesburg where we would then proceed to drive 600km to Kruger Park. After exploring the park we’d fly to Cape Town and drive to Hermanus to go Shark Cage Diving, and another flight to Johannesburg, and then another one onto Vilankulo, Mozambique for some scuba diving….yup, then another flight back to Johannesburg, then another back to Ethipioa (sleep there a night,) then onto Mali–then to Dakar, Senegal again and after two days a flight to New York, and finally home- Montreal.

All in all 12 flights in 5 weeks.

We had to find the best way to take all of our scuba diving gear without getting dinged with overweight fees.

Solution: Dive company revolutionizes scuba travel market by making a travel BC that’s the perfect carry-on companion, and fits carry–on regulations and stowes nicely above your head or under your seat for your flight.: Appropriately named the AERIS Jetpack. It’s a BC. It’s a Bag. It’s a wing. Which we love. It’s sleek. And it makes you breakfast. But only on Tuesdays;)

#ExploreAfrica #Expeditioners #Aeris

Bella Gear Guide: Thermarest Trekker Chair Review Videos in English & in French

THE EXPEDITIONERS

BELLA GEAR Review – in English & French

(ATM) ADVENTURE TRAVEL MOMENTS EPISODE #11
ENGLISH Thermarest Trekker Chair Review
SPONSORED by: Scott Canoes
www.scottcanoe.com
Location: Massasauga Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada

Expeditioner Bella takes you through one of her favourite pieces of camping equipment: a sleeping pad, and Thermarest’s Folding Trekker Chair for 20″ Wide Pads.

You can also watch the video in French! Vous pouvez aussi voir notre video on Francais dessus:)